Open Way Zen Brisbane
Open Way Zen Brisbane

Open Way Zen Brisbane

Zen meditation meetings of the Open Way Brisbane Zen Group are held at the Quaker Meeting House, 10 Hampson Street, in Kelvin Grove from 7:00pm to 9:00pm EVERY WEDNESDAY (see map below).

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Visitors are welcome to attend. If you are new to the Zen style of meditation, a brief introduction can be provided before the meeting with prior arrangement.

The root teacher of the Open Way Zen group is eminent Japanese Zen Master Hogen Yamahata

The meetings are conducted in silence, with a number of 35-40 minute sitting periods, separated by about 5 minutes of slow walking meditation. There is often a talk or reading as well. There is a fee of $7.00 to cover the cost of the venue.

The orientation brochure contains more on the Zen approach to meditation. Zen Mountain Monastery also has a useful introduction to zen meditation. Alternatively, please contact Peter Bruza in one of the following ways:

Mobile: 0421 010 167

Email:

Map

The Open Way Zen sutra books (including the Heart and Metta sutras) are available for download here.


Open Way Zen Byron Bay

Regular practice sessions are held every week day (not on holidays or weekends) starting at 6:30am to 7:30am, with another hour starting at 7:30am on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Sessions comprise of zazen (seated meditation), kinhin (walking meditation), and the occasional dharma talk or discussion.

For futher information and address details please contact Kester on 0422 175 478 or email


Open Way Zen Murwillumbah

Murwillumbah Zazen Monday evenings 5:00 for 5:15.

For details phone Eric Dokan: 0491 470 981
Or if no response in a reasonable time please ring Cameron: 0481 856 724 or Judy: 0400 521 142


Open Way Zen Cairns

Mindfulness Meditation Practice. Wednesday evenings at 6.30pm with Quentin Genshu

These will take place at the Khacho Yulo Ling Buddhist Centre in Severin Street Cairns.

'The Blessed One spoke as follows:-

This is the only way, monks, for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, for the destruction of suffering and grief, for reaching the right path, for the attainment of Nibbana, namely the four Foundations of Mindfulness. What are the four?

Herein a monk lives contemplating the body in the body, ardent, clearly comprehending and mindful, having overcome, in this world, covertness, and grief; he lives contemplating feelings in feelings, ardent, clearly comprehending and mindful, having overcome, in this world, covetousness and grief; he lives contemplating mind states in mind states, ardent, clearly comprehending and mindful, having overcome, in this world, covetousness and grief; he lives contemplating mental objects in mental objects, ardent, clearly comprehending and mindful, having overcome, in this world, covertness and grief.'


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